ETU Media Releases

ETU Media Releases

24hr Media Enquiries: 0418 655 682

Industrial action postponed at nation’s largest electricity distributor after conditional in-principle agreement reached

Paul Lister - Thursday, February 01, 2018

Planned industrial action by workers at Ausgrid, the nation’s largest electricity distributor has been put on hold after more than 100 workplace delegates this afternoon gave their conditional support to a workplace agreement that will deliver wage rises to staff for the first time in four years.

The development follows a vote last month where thousands of union members employed at Ausgrid, which owns and operates the electricity poles and wires that deliver power across Sydney, Newcastle, the Central Coast and Hunter, overwhelmingly supported imposing work stoppages, bans and other industrial actions unless a new wage deal was struck.

Today’s meeting examined a revised offer by Ausgrid management that includes pay increases of 2.75 per cent, 2.5 per cent, and 2.25 per cent over the next three years, along with a $1,600 cash bonus for each employee, and protection against forced redundancies in line with the NSW Government’s privatisation employment protections.

The Electrical Trades Union said workers at the company, which is jointly owned by the NSW Government, Australian Super and IFM Investors, have endured a wage freeze since 2014, along with the loss of almost 2000 skilled jobs during the same time period.

“Union delegates representing their co-workers across the network this afternoon voted to provide their conditional support to key elements of Ausgrid’s offer,” ETU secretary Dave McKinley.

“The agreement is subject to further negotiations and improvements to agreement wording.”

“After four years of failed negotiations, the loss of approximately a third of the workforce, and a freeze on wages, the ETU is optimistic that full agreement may now be possible once members have had the opportunity to vote on a final offer.

“Industrial action has always been a last resort, and it is disappointing that it took the threat of major customer disruptions to finally get Ausgrid management to come to the negotiating table with a half decent offer for members to consider.”

“There is more work to do however negotiations now appear to be heading the right direction.”